Research and Insights Archive

Research and Insights from the Center for Effective Organizations

Work without Jobs: How to Reboot Your Organization’s Work Operating System (Management on the Cutting Edge)

Work without Jobs: How to Reboot Your Organization’s Work Operating System (Management on the Cutting Edge)

Work is traditionally understood as a “job,” and workers as “jobholders.” Jobs are structured by titles, hierarchies, and qualifications. In Work without Jobs, the Wall Street Journal bestseller, Ravin Jesuthasan and John Boudreau propose a radically new way of looking at work. They describe a new “work operating system” that deconstructs jobs into their component parts and reconstructs these components into more optimal combinations that reflect the skills and abilities of individual workers. In a new normal of rapidly accelerating automation, demands for organizational agility, efforts to increase diversity, and the emergence of alternative work arrangements, the old system based on jobs and jobholders is cumbersome and ungainly. Jesuthasan and Boudreau’s new system lays out a roadmap for the future of work.

Robots Don’t Get Sick

Robots Don’t Get Sick

COVID and other current crises have revealed the value of work automation, with justifiable celebration.* Scientists at the University of Liverpool have a new lab assistant with a very strong work ethic: a robot chemist that conducts experiments by itself. The 1.75-metre-tall intelligent robot moves around the laboratory, avoiding human co-workers and obstacles while performing […]

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Looking Beyond the Novelty to the Future of Work

Looking Beyond the Novelty to the Future of Work

Navigating the Paradox with Four Questions The current paradox requires effectively managing the crisis, AND looking beyond today’s accomplishments to take actions now, that will sustain the vital lessons for the future.  These four questions help guide the journey through the paradox, to create the most pivotal value for the future of work: What are […]

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